Pumpkin Carving into a jack-o-lantern

Pumpkin carving can be a wonderful family activity, but one little slip and the fun can quickly turn into a trip to the emergency room. If you’re an American adult, we’re going to make the assumption that you’ve probably carved a pumpkin before and know firsthand how slippery and tough they can be – how easy it is for a knife to slip, go through the skin and out the other side where your hand is holding the pumpkin steady.

So as a suggestion, consider decorating your pumpkin or follow a couple pumpkin carving safety tips to keep you and your family from becoming a Halloween accident statistic.

Pumpkin Carving Injury Statistics:

pumpkin patch

  • During October and November 2013, more than half of the estimated 4,400 Halloween-related injuries involved pumpkin carving.
  • According to Handcare.org Halloween is one of the top three holidays that produce the most emergency room visits.
  • According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, children ages 10-14 sustained the greatest proportion of injuries (30.3 percent) of those 33.3 percent were lacerations and 20.1 percent were fractures

Pumpkin Carving Safety Tips:

pumpkin carving procedure

  • Choose the right pumpkin – one that is sturdy with a flat bottom.
  • Carve pumpkins in a well-lit area.
  • Take your time.
  • Leave the carving to adults – let the kiddos trace the stencil on the pumpkin an use a spoon to remove the pulp and seeds.
  • Sharper knives aren’t better – they can get stuck in pumpkin tissue.
  • Us a pumpkin carving kit – with special saws, stencils and scoops.
  • If the kids want to carve the pumpkin themselves make sure to get a pumpkin carving kit specifically meant for kids.

Sources:

  • cpsc.gov
  • kids.usa.gov
  • aaos.org
  • handcare.org